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Adoption Books

This is a short summary of books that I think will be useful to those who are considering adopting or have already adopted.  A number of these books have been either been written by or referenced by our telecourse and webinar presenters. If you are interested in one of these books, just click on the picture of the book cover for more information or to purchase the book through Amazon.com.

If you want to search for or purchase an adoption book you do not see listed, please click on the Amazon.com link to the right. If you would like to recommend a book to be listed here, please click on the link and let us know.

Books marked “New” have recently been added to our list.   You can also click on one of the categories below to jump to books on that topic.

 

Adoption Reference

Russian Language/Culture

Attachment in Adoption

Sensory Integration

Parenting

Talking About Adoption

Adoption Reference

 

The Complete Book of International Adoption: A Step-by-Step Guide to Finding Your Child

“The Complete Book of International Adoption” by Dawn Davenport is a brand new book that just came out in 2006 that has very good current information about international adoption.  If you are trying to decide which country to adopt from, this book is a great resource. In the back of the book, it has a country by country section that gives great details that I have not seen in any other book, and includes what experience shows the stability of adoption programs from different countries, information about the Hague Treaty, post adoption reports, why children are available for adoption, and informational about what international medical doctors are seeing in children from these countries. This book has a lot of real life examples from adoptive families.

 

The Russian Adoption Handbook

This is a must have book for anyone considering or in process of adopting from Russia or Eastern Europe.  This book was written by John H. Maclean, a father of two adoptive children from Russia, and is the most popular of all books of adoptive parents who adopted from Eastern Europe. This book was one of only three books (due to all the weight I had to carry) that I traveled with when I went to Russia, and I took it on both trips. It is very detailed and accurate.  The description of my son’s region was right on target.  (Also, a little hint, be sure to get the latest version of this book - I made the error of getting the older version-the newer version is even better.) You’ll be sure to get the latest version through by clicking on the picture of the book at right. John Maclean has hosted “Q&A with John Maclean” on ThinkingOfAdopting.com in December 2005 and May 2006, and his knowledge was simply incredible. We hope to have him back again soon.

 

The Chinese Adoption Handbook

“The Chinese Adoption Handbook:  How to adopt from China and Korea” was written by John H. Maclean, the same adoptive father and author who wrote the Russian Adoption Handbook (see above). It has the same in depth, detail style as his first book on Russia.  This is a great book for anyone considering or in process of adopting from China.  John Maclean has hosted “Q&A with John Maclean” on ThinkingOfAdopting.com in December 2005 and May 2006, and we hope to have him back again soon.

 

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Adoption, Second Edition

Written by Christine Adamec, a mother of an adopted child plus two biological children and co-author of the Encylopedia of Adoption, this is a great reference book if you’re at the early stages of your adoption journey. Don’t let the title fool you. This is one of the books I reference in my webinar “Tips on Selecting an Adoption Agency”.  

 

Adoption for Dummies

Written by Tracy Barr, another good reference book if you are at the early stages of your adoption journey.  Again, don’t let the title fool you -- there’s lots of good information in here. Another of the books I reference in my webinar “Tips on Selecting an Adoption Agency”.  

 

How to Adopt Internationally

This book is a great resource for anyone considering international adoption. ( I wish I would have read it before I adopted my son). It gives step by step details of the adoption process.  It includes many sample forms of paperwork that is required as well as a lot of practical information on what to expect.  It also gives, helpful, in depth information about countries where children are available.  If you are unsure on what country you want to adopt from, this is a good unbiased book. There are also great tips on how to pick an adoption agency, sample referrals from various countries, legal proceedings and travel.

 

The Handbook of International Adoption Medicine

Written by Dr. Laurie C. Miller, this a great book for anyone considering adoption, in process or already an adoptive parent.  It has more details and statistics than any other adoption book I have seen. Obviously, there was tremendous research that went into this book.  I was concerned it may be too technical to read, but it is well written and very informative. There are pictures and examples throughout the book.  You can see statistics on smoking, alcohol use, drug use, etc. listed by country... this is great information for families who are trying to decide what country to adopt from.   There are also pictures of things like scabies, rickets, fetal alcohol. There are good sections on the effects of institutionalization, pre-adoption counseling and evaluation of the referral, effect of stress in early life and developmental delay. This book is one of the best to have if you plan to adopt internationally.

 

Adopting a Toddler

This is a great book for anyone who is considering or in process of adopting a toddler. It gives great tips on traveling with a toddler as well as how to prepare your home for a toddler -- which can be a bit more challenging as we found out!

Attachment in Adoption

 

Becoming a Family: Promoting Healthy Attachment

Written by Lark Eshleman, Ph.D. who has presented her webinar “Promoting Healthy Attachment” on ThinkingOfAdopting.com , I believe that you will find this book to be an excellent resource on Attachment. I personally have a copy and found  it provides great information not only on how to foster attachment with your new child including preparing your home, what to do when bringing your baby home, and how to parent to enhance attachment), but also on how to cope with attachment disorders such as health care from an attachment perspective, how to make school a positive in your child's life, and how to get professional help for children with Reactive Attachment Disorder.  You can learn more by listening to my 7/8/06 interview with Dr. Lark Eshleman on the Thinking Of Adopting Podcast.

 

Connecting With Kids Through Stories:  Using Narratives To Facilitate Attachment in Adopted Children

Written by Denise Lacher, Todd Nichols, and Joanne May, this book was on the “Resource List” given by Lark Eshleman during her ThinkingOfAdopting.com webinar, “Promoting Healthy Attachment” on July 9, 2006. 

 

Theraplay: Helping Parents and Children Build Better Relationships Through Attachment Based Play

Written by Ann M. Jernberg and Phyllis B. Booth, this book was referenced by Lark Eshleman during her ThinkingOfAdopting.com webinar, “Promoting Healthy Attachment” on July 9, 2006. 

 

Beyond Consequences, Logic, and Control: A Love-Based Approach to Helping Attachment-Challenged Children With Severe Behaviors

Written by Heather T. Forbes and B. Bryan Post, this book was referenced by Lark Eshleman during her ThinkingOfAdopting.com webinar, “Promoting Healthy Attachment” on July 9, 2006. 

 

The Developing Mind: Toward a Neurobiology of Interpersonal Experience

Written by Daniel J. Siegel, this book was on the “Resource List” given by Lark Eshleman during her ThinkingOfAdopting.com webinar, “Promoting Healthy Attachment” on July 9, 2006. 

 

Affect Dysregulation and Disorders of the Self & Affect Regulation and the Repair of the Self (two-volume set)

Written by Allan N. Schore, this book was on the “Resource List” given by Lark Eshleman during her ThinkingOfAdopting.com webinar, “Promoting Healthy Attachment” on July 9, 2006. 

 

Attaching in Adoption

Written by Deborah D. Gray, this book was on the “Resource List” given by Dawn Choate during her ThinkingOfAdopting.com telecourse, “Healing Hannah” on October 25, 2006. 

 

Building the Bonds of Attachment: Awakening Love in Deeply Troubled Children

Written by Daniel A. Hughes, one of the main speakers of “The Face of Trauma, The Heart of Healing”, an attachment conference presented by the Institute of Children and Families (Dr. Lark Eshleman, Director) April 19 and 20, 2007.

 

Facilitating Developmental Attachment: The Road to Emotional Recovery and Behavioral Change in Foster and Adopted Children

Written by Daniel A. Hughes, one of the main speakers of “The Face of Trauma, The Heart of Healing”, an attachment conference presented by the Institute of Children and Families (Dr. Lark Eshleman, Director) April 19 and 20, 2007.

Parenting

 

Adoption Parenting

“Adoption Parenting: Creating a Toolbox, Building Connections” by Jean MacLeod and Sheena Macrae is a book that I’m currently reading (9/6/06). I’m very impressed with this book -- I’ve actually been searching quite a while for a book like this. “Adoption Parenting” is an excellent source of information for pre- and post-adoptive parents.

 

Help for the Hopeless Child: A Guide for Families

Written by by Dr. Ronald S. Federici, a neuropsychologist and a father of seven adopted children, this book is not only useful for adoptive parents who are experiencing challenges, but also has two sections in Chapter 4 that are of particular interest to pre-adoptive parents. The first is “Understanding the Complexities of US and International Adoptions”  -- an informative chapter if section to read if you are trying to pick where to adopt from.   The second is, “Detoxification from Institutionalization”, which provides over 20 points on what adoptive parents should do when the first get home with their new child. I highly recommend reading this section.

 

1-2-3 Magic: Effective Discipline for Children 2-12

“1-2-3 Magic:  Effective Discipline for Children 2-12” by Dr. Thomas Phelan (who held the telecourse “1-2-3 Magic” on ThinkingOfAdopting.com) shows a simple and effective way to deal with challenging behavior. Using “counting”, you help your child to stop unwanted behavior and then progress to encouraging good behavior.  Best of all, it works to take the emotion out of the process for both the parents and the child. My husband and I thank that Dr. Phelan really understand the challenges that parents face, and are using “1-2-3 Magic” at home. You can learn more by listening to my 4/4/06 interview with Dr. Phelan on the Thinking Of Adopting Podcast.

 

All About Attention Deficit Disorder

“All About Attention Deficit Disorder: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment: Children and Adults” by Dr. Thomas Phelan, who presented “Ask About ADD/ADHD Live” on ThinkingOfAdopting.com.  It is an excellent reference on ADD including symptoms, diagnosis and treatment as well as his practical approach to behavior management (he is the parent of a child with ADD) at both home and in school.

 

The Explosive Child

“The Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding and Parenting Easily Frustrated, Chronically Inflexible Children” by Ross W. Greene, Ph.D. was mentioned by Dr. Thomas Phelan during the 9/17/08 presentation of “Ask About ADD/ADHD Live” on ThinkingOfAdopting.com. 

 

The Post-Adoption Blues: Overcoming the Unforseen Challenges of Adoption

Written by Karen J. Foli, PhD and John R. Thompson, this is a good book to read prior to adoption, and helps you prepare emoitionally for when you first return home.  Recommended to me by an adoptive parent and on the “Resource List” given by Dawn Choate during her ThinkingOfAdopting.com telecourse, “Healing Hannah”  on October 25, 2006.

Russian Language/Culture

 

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Learning Russian

“The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Learning Russian” written by Christopher Froehlich is listed by Russian born, native speaker Tatyana Komarova as a recommended book in her ThinkingOfAdopting.com webinar, Russian for the Adoption Traveler I”

Sensory Integration

 

The Out of Sync Child

“The Out of Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder” written by Carol Stock Kranowitz, and expert in sensory processing disorder -- a common but misunderstood problem that affects a child’s behavior.  This is a great book to help you recognize and overcome sensory processing challenges, and a good read even if you don’t believe your child has sensory processing disorder.  Carol has presented the webinar, “Early Intervention at Home and School for Out of Sync Children” on ThinkingOfAdopting.com

 

Sensational Kids

“Sensational Kids: Hope and Help for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder” written by Lucy Jane Miller, Ph.D., OTR, and Doris A. Fuller was referenced by Carol Stock Kranowitz during her interview with Robin Bartko on the Thinking Of Adopting Podcast as a “wonderful book” that “compliments the Out of Sync Child”.

 

Sensory Integration and the Child

Reissued in 2005, “Sensory Integration and the Child: Understanding Hidden Sensory Challenges” written by A. Jean Ayres, Ph.D., OTR was referenced by Carol Stock Kranowitz during her interview with Robin Bartko on the Thinking of Adopting Podcast in March 2007. Dr. Ayres is credited with having first identified sensory integrative disfunction and was one of the pioneers in the development of the theory and therapy.

Talking About Adoption

 

WISE-UP!

This is a great book for your child to learn how to prepare herself for questions about adoption.  Written by Marilyn Scholettle of the Center for Adoption Support and Education (C.A.S.E.)

 

Beneath the Mask

Written by Debbie Riley, Executive Director of the Center for Adoption Support and Education (C.A.S.E.), “Beneath the Mask” helps prepare you as a parent for the challenges that are faced by adoptive teens and their families.  The Debbie Riley discusses six “stuck spots” that your adopted teen my experience and how you can help her deal with them.

 

S.A.F.E. at School

“Support for Adoptive Families and Educators (S.A.F.E.) at School”, this is a book to give to teachers and counselors to educate them on creating a positive adoption environment in school.  This would make a great teacher gift! Written by Marilyn Schoettle of the Center for Adoption Support and Education (C.A.S.E).

SAFE at School

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